Risk Management

Legislative Cleanup: California Senate Attempts to Clear Up S.B. 1343 Sexual Harassment Training Confusion | California Benefits Agency

On February 26, 2019, California Senate Bill 778 was introduced to clear up confusion about when employers are required to provide employees with sexual harassment prevention training and education under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (as amended by Senate Bill 1343) and when retraining is required. Read about S.B. 1343 in our blog.

What is the Law Now?

As the law reads now, an employer with five or more employees must provide classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment prevention (at least two hours to all supervisory employees and at least one hour to all nonsupervisory employees in California) within six months of an employee’s assumption of a position. Current law also states that employers who have provided this training to employees after January 1, 2019, are not required to provide sexual harassment training and education by the January 1, 2020 deadline.

What are the Proposed Changes?

Senate Bill 778 only changes about three sentences in the law, but these small changes will carry significant weight if the bill passes as predicted. Here are some of the key portions of the FEHA, at Cal. Govt. Code § 12950.1, that would be amended (current law in regular type, new law in italics, removed law in bold) by 778:

“By January 1, 2020, an employer having five or more employees shall provide at least two hours of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all supervisory employees and at least one hour of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all nonsupervisory employees in California within six months of their assumption of a position. position, and thereafter refresher training to each employee once every two years. An employer may provide this training in conjunction with other training provided to the employees. The training may be completed by employees individually or as part of a group presentation, and may be completed in shorter segments, as long as the applicable hourly total requirement is met. An employer who has provided this training and education to an employee after January 1, 2019, 2018, is not required to provide refresher training and education by the January 1, 2020, deadline. After January 1, 2020, each employer covered by this section shall provide sexual harassment training and education to each employee in California once every two years. until after December 31, 2020.”

If enacted as written, this would mean the following for covered employers under S.B. 778:

  • After providing the mandatory training and education, employers must provide a “refresher training” for each employee once every two years; and

  • If an employer provided sexual harassment prevention training and education to employees after January 1, 2018, then they are not required to do so again until after December 31, 2020.

Of note, the bill does not provide a description of a “refresher training.”

If enacted, S.B. 778 clarifies the issue of whether employees need to be retrained even if they were trained in 2018. The answer is no.

Just to rephrase, under the terms introduced by S.B. 778:

  • Training must be provided to employees by January 1, 2020;

  • Thereafter, refresher training must be provided to each employee once every two years; and

  • If an employer provided training in 2018, then it would not need to retrain in 2019 but rather, refresher training and education would not be required to be provided until after December 31, 2020.

How Does This Impact My Workplace?

Right now, S.B. 778 has zero impact on your workplace. Is the bill interesting? Yes! Does it change anything today? No! That is because the bill has merely been introduced and is not an enacted law.

Additionally, the history of actions on the bill (viewable on this page) states that it may be acted upon on or after March 29, 2019.

What Now?

Experts predict this bill will move to enactment without modification. So if it is enacted, then your workplace could be directly impacted.

But don’t forget, California AB 1825 training is still required on a two year cycle! So as always, in implementing a best practice approach, employers that did not provide sexual harassment prevention training for their supervisory employees in 2018 (because their two-year cycle hit in 2019) must ensure the AB 1825 training is met this year.

Moreover, we recommend that employers provide non-supervisory employees with the sexual harassment prevention training and education as required under S.B. 1343. The intent of S.B. 778 is to clarify timelines, not circumvent or deviate from training. Moreover, the spirit of the law remains the same, to ensure that employers provide ALL employees with the necessary education and training to function and conduct themselves in a workplace that is free from sexual harassment.

by Samantha Yurman
Originally posted on ThinkHR.com

The Right Information at the Right Time | California Benefits Partners

We are all drinking from a firehose of news and information — all day, every day. With this deluge of information, it can be difficult to determine what’s truly important to know. But being reactive is not acceptable. You need to know what’s coming, what affects you, and how it affects you.

Take, for example, legislative changes — 80 percent don’t require your attention, but the 20 percent you need to act on can easily get lost in the noise. It’s the 20 percent that expose your business to risk, but how do you know which 80 percent of information you can safely ignore?

Paying attention to the right information at the right time and setting the rest aside – knowing what you need to know – is essential to anticipating and understanding risk.

Where People Risk Management Comes In

People risk management starts with anticipating and understanding what presents risks to your business. It’s the idea you can look at something, understand it, digest it, and know if and how you need to act on this information. It’s a complicated sequence that no one has time to do, which is why you need a trusted and knowledgeable partner who:

  1. Knows what’s in the pipeline, such as newly-introduced bills that have the potential to become law.

  2. Keeps an eye on at what’s actually happening that may affect employers, such as when bills pass, agencies issue directives, or courts rule on cases.

  3. Determines what presents any type of risk to employers – such as litigation, noncompliance, or reduced employee engagement – and what doesn’t require action.

  4. Communicates promptly, consistently, and effectively, so you can use this knowledge to update your policies, stay on top of compliance requirements, and incorporate best practices in a way that reduces risk for your unique business.

Understanding People Risks: An Example

Often, when we think about risks to employers, we focus on insurable risks because they are well understood and easily quantifiable. It’s important to address these risks with solid prevention plans and insurance products, but it’s the uninsurable categories of risks, particularly people risks, that can catch us off guard and unprepared.

People risks can result not just in financial loss, but damage to employee engagement and company culture. They tend to be more subject to interpretation and can be very abstract.

Take, for example, the consequences of hiring the wrong employee or losing a valued employee. When this happens, you bear the cost of lost productivity and the time and money invested in recruiting, hiring, and onboarding. You also risk litigation if policies are not adequately documented, communicated, and followed should the employee claim discrimination, harassment, or disability accommodation is to blame for their separation from the company.

Hiring the wrong employee or losing a valued employee also carries the risk of negatively affecting employee engagement, which is a well-documented predictor of business outcomes. If it happens regularly, or there is even one instance handled poorly, your employment brand can be tarnished. For example, it could result in bad reviews on recruiting sites, chipping away at your recognition as an employer of choice.

by Larry Dunivan
Originally posted on ThinkHR.com